Monday, November 19, 2012

Heather Hicks


I teach and do research in the areas of post-1945 American and global Anglophone fiction, apocalyptic literature, feminist fiction and theory, postmodern theory, science fiction, and contemporary film. I’ve recently taught courses on the question of whether fiction since 2000 meets the criteria of the “postmodern;” 20th century science fiction; recent feminist fiction (yes, it exists!); and an undergraduate course on apocalyptic literature from pre-history to the present day.

In my scholarship, I’m interested in literature about various forms of contemporary crisis. My new book, The Post-Apocalyptic Novel in the Twenty-First Century: Modernity Beyond Salvage (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), analyzes how major novelists since 2000 have imagined the fate of modernity in the wake of global catastrophe. My first book, The Culture of Soft Work: Labor, Gender, and Race in Postmodern American Narrative (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), examined the ways that a wide range of cultural texts from comic strips to films to major novels responded to the changing nature of the American workplace (and American workers) after World War Two. I’ve recently become interested in a more transhistorical approach to literary study, and I’m working on a new book on the history of apocalyptic fiction, covering the evolution of this genre from the early 18th century to the present. I’m especially interested in how depictions of gender and race have figured in this fascinating body of literature.

No comments:

Post a Comment